For After-Hours Emergency Care


University of Florida
Small Animal Hospital

PH: (352) 392-2235
2089 SW 16th Ave
Gainesville, Fl 32608

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Searching Gainesville for a 'Veterinarian Near Me'? 

Finding a Gainesville Animal Hospital that is nearby and can provide all of the pet care services that you need IS available right here.  We have 10 veterinarians on staff in 3 traditional animal hospitals, and 1 holistic hospital in Alachua County, Florida.  

Wellness Packages

We offer a number of total health care plans from kitten or puppy packages, to canine and feline annual packages, to senior wellness packages for the older pets.

Learn more here about what our doctors do while examining your pet!

Companion Laser Therapy

Laser Therapy can help reduce pain and inflammation for pain conditions such as fractures, wounds, post-surgery pain, post-dentals, arthritis, hip displasia, or degenerative joint disease, among others painful conditions. Relief and/or improvement is often noticed within hours, and can work in conjunction with regular treatment protocols by your favorite veterinarian in Gainesville or Newberry, Florida. Click here for a full information pdf.  Click here to read the benefits.

Surgeries

Click HERE to visit our new surgery page!

Boarding and Kennels

We offer short-term boarding services for our existing clients. Our Main Street and Newberry locations have both had recent renovations to our boarding areas. We do require all patients to be current on vaccinations and free of external/internal parasites in order to board with us. We also offer exit-boarding baths, special dips, and baths with flea prevention, prices vary upon weight. To avoid potential hazards, your pets collars and leashes will be removed and returned to you when your pet is dropped off for boarding. For sanitary and parasite control reasons, we provide all bowls and bedding, which we wash in hospital.  We do provide towels and blankets for our boarding canines to keep them comfortable. If your dog has a bed that needs to be with them for a medical reason, we will accommodate it, but we cannot accept any responsibility for loss or damage. We do not have the capability of cleaning dog beds.  Our feline friends that board with us will be provided blankets and cushions for their comfort. 

** Dogs are walked 3 times per day and exercised in our yards. (additional walks are available for an additional cost)
** If your pet boards for 5 nights or longer with us, your pet is entitled to a bath at 1/2 price (including ear cleaning and nail trim).  Please call our client service representatives for pricing.

Dental

Dental care for pets is recommended mainly because Periodontal Disease is the number one diagnosed problem in dogs and cats. Regular dental care is a must to keep your pet healthy. In order to avoid periodontal disease you should regularly brush your pet’s teeth with dog or cat toothpaste. If toothpaste is difficult for you to apply we also offer other products such as; flushes, rinses, chews, and water additives. Regular dental exams and cleanings can help improve your pet’s overall health. Click here to read our 2018 newsletter for more information about Periodontal Disease.

Radiographic Imaging X-ray

A Direct Digital Radiologic suite reduces patient exposure and decreases the amount of time to get total quality images. In addition to the safety aspect, the digital image quality is state of the art and allows us to store, transmit and enhance the images using our computer network. This advanced technology will provide our doctors with a higher degree of diagnostics allowing for increased radiographic capabilities well beyond the traditional methods.

Ultrasound

This is a great tool to provide our doctors with a non-invasive look inside. One of the most common reasons for a veterinarian to use ultrasound is as an aid to diagnosis. For example, if a male cat is brought in by an owner who claims that the cat is having difficulty urinating, the veterinarian might use ultrasound to check for an obstruction in the bladder or urethra. While examining these organs the veterinarian can also look at bladder thickness, and for bladder stones. Ultrasound can also be used to examine suspicious masses and other findings which occur during a manual exam. It can also be used in emergency settings to look for serious medical problems such as internal organs damaged in a collision.

Radiosurgery

This unit is used during many surgical procedures.  It allows the surgeon to cut and coagulate (stop bleeding), using radio-waves. This state-of-the art equipment works with a radiofrequency tip that actually becomes energized but does not become hot. Because it functions this way, there is no risk of shock or electrical burns as seen with conventional electrocautery. Radiowave surgery offers many benefits such as; decreased blood loss, reduced risk of infection, minimized tissue destruction, and quicker recovery time. Radiosurgery can be employed for spay/neuter, tumor removal, mastectomy, skin tags and biopsy procedures. Ask the doctor’s and staff about this new technique.

Acupuncture

Acupuncture is used worldwide, either by itself or with Western medicine, to treat a wide variety of problems in many domestic and exotic animals. Acupuncture is the insertion of tiny needles into specific points on the body to promote health and prevent or treat disease. In Eastern medicine disease is considered an imbalance of the body’s energy.  Acupuncture serves to balance the body’s energy and help heal disease.  In Western Medicine acupuncture can improve many physiological changes such as an increase in blood circulation, stimulation of nerves, relief of muscle spasms and release of hormones like endorphins for pain relief and cortisol for anti-inflammation.

Acupuncture can be an excellent therapy for chronic conditions that are managed rather than completely cured with western medicine. This can include many musculoskeletal problems such as arthritis, disc disease, seizures, gastrointestinal disorders such as vomiting, diarrhea and constipation, chronic respiratory problems such as asthma, and skin problems, kidney disease and some urinary tract disorders.

A pet may feel a slight sensation like a tingle with the needle but most relax during a session. Side effects of acupuncture are rare, but they do exist. A pet’s condition may seem worse for up to 48 hours after a treatment. Other animals may become sleepy or lethargic for 24 hours after acupuncture. These effects are an indication that some physiological changes are occurring, and they are generally followed by an improvement in the pet’s condition. Pets that are pregnant, have a fracture, open wound or infectious disease are not considered good candidates for acupuncture.

The length and frequency of acupuncture treatments depends on the condition of the patient and the method of stimulation that is used by the veterinary acupuncturist. Stimulation of an individual acupuncture point may take as little as 10 seconds or as much as 30 minutes. Treatment generally last from 20 to 60 minutes. A simple acute problem, such as a sprain, may require only one treatment, whereas more severe or chronic ailments may need several treatments. Some degenerative conditions may require long-term monthly care.

When multiple treatments are necessary, they usually begin intensively and are tapered to maximum efficiency. Patients often start with 1-3 treatments per week for 4–6 weeks. Some improvement is usually seen within the first three treatments. Once a maximum positive response is achieved (usually after 4-8 treatments), treatments are tapered off so that the greatest amount of symptom free time elapses between them. Many animals with chronic conditions can taper off to 2-4 treatments per year.

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